May 142014
 

The grant’s annual ~$1.25 million funding (direct costs) will be supplemented with $1 million in university funding over the five-year cycle and will help to implement CEED’s vision to pursue precision environmental health research through the integration of clinical, basic and population-based studies. CEED will leverage its extensive experience and expertise with new capabilities in exposure biology, epigenomics and microbiomics. 

Funding will support such specific uses as enhancing technology and laboratories; providing training, mentoring and career development opportunities to junior and established investigators or clinicians entering environmental health research; supporting innovative research and emerging science through pilot grants; developing research and engagement programs that address community health needs; and presenting research findings to stakeholders, including local, state and federal government agencies to provide guidance on mitigation of risk.

[Read the full story here.]
 May 14, 2014
Nov 112013
 

From Rutgers Today – November 11, 2013.

Rutgers researcher and CEED member Joan Bennett’s work on indoor mold exposure follows her own illness suffered while cleaning up flood damage from Hurricane Katrina.

Scientists at Rutgers and Emory universities have discovered that a compound often emitted by mold may be linked to symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

Arati Inamdar and Joan Bennett, researchers in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers, used fruit flies to establish the connection between the compound – popularly known as mushroom alcohol – and the malfunction of two genes involved in the packaging and transport of dopamine, the chemical released by nerve cells to send messages to other nerve cells in the brain.

[Read the full story here.]
 November 11, 2013
Nov 112013
 

From Rutgers Today – November 11, 2013.

A report co-authored by Rutgers researcher and CEED member Sue Shapses warns of the dangers extended power outages can pose to older New Jerseyans.

Everyone knows Superstorm Sandy left many New Jersey homes and businesses battered and bruised. But most are not aware of the considerable toll the storm and its aftermath took on our state’s residents.

“With disasters, there are things beyond the obvious,” said Rutgers’ Sue Shapses, a professor in the department of Nutrition and chair of the Interagency Council of Osteoporosis. “There are real health hazard risks, especially falling and fracturing. And it’s especially a problem for our elderly population.”

[Read the full story here.]
 November 11, 2013
Oct 012013
 
Summer 2013 THED participants and mentors

Summer 2013 THED participants and mentors

Rutgers EOHSI/COEC Program for High School Students Featured in NIEHS Newsletter.

Thanks, in part, to NIEHS-funded programs at Rutgers University, 46 high school students gained new insights into laboratory techniques and real-world applications of toxicology this summer.

The young people, rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors from 30 high schools in New Jersey and surrounding states, were participants in the first Toxicology, Health, and Environmental Disease (THED) High School Summer Program held at the Rutgers University Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) and Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy. The Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and the School of Public Health, along with the NIEHS Center for Environmental Exposure and Disease, provided additional support for the program.

[Read the full story here.]
 October 1, 2013